Documentary City

arkitekcher:

Vertical Glass House  |  Atelier FCJZ

Location: Longteng Avenue, Xuhui, Shanghai, China

(via thomortiz)

fer1972:

Chocolate LEGO Teddy Bears by Akihiro Mizuuchi

prettyarchitecture:

Pretty Architecture presents: Glass houses S2E1

This open glass house doesn’t leave much to the imagination, but is sure to spark some creative thinking of your own! Netherlands architecture firm Hans van Heeswijk Architects designed this stunning glass wall house in Amsterdam, where the interior is always on display. (And if you value your privacy, this isn’t the place for you! But, it’s definitely worth a tour for the architecture lovers out there.) 

In fact, it’s the residence of Hans van Heeswijk, who wanted a spacious, light-filled place full of dramatic details to call “home.” Inside, this open concept home design welcomes you with a vast, open interior - an open-to-above living area punctuated with open staircases zigzagging their way up, and contemporary loft levels cutting across from one side to the other. 

At the center of the home, a “magic box” rises three storeys and is clad in wenge wood, housing storage closets, a bathroom every floor and a dumbwaiter. Topping off this contemporary design, a rooftop terrace overlooks the waterfront. Hans van Heeswijk Architects

via Arch Daily
photo credit: Imre Csany/Csany Studio

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The coming four days the remaining parts of the ‘glass-series’ are uploaded at 20:00 hrs (UTC+1).

(via ryanpanos)

archatlas:

ehoeho

(Source: thekhooll, via amunt)

rudygodinez:

Mies van der Rohe, Villa Tugendhat, (1930)

The Villa Tugendhat was commissioned by the wealthy newlyweds Grete & Fritz Tugendhat, a Jewish couple with family money from textile manufacturing companies in Brno. The couple met Mies van der Rohe in Berlin in 1927, and was already impressed by his design for the Zehlendorf house of Edward Fuchs. As fans of spacious homes with simple forms, Mies’ free plan method was perfect for the Tugendhats’ taste; however, he was not their only interest in an architect for their own home. They originally confronted Brno’s foremost modern architect at the time, Arnost Wiesner, but after visiting various projects by each architect, the Tugendhats ultimately went with Mies.

Mies visited the site in September of 1928, and had already produced plans by December of that same year. He shared his design with the Tugendhat family that new year’s eve, and with a few minor changes new plans were drafted and set into motion. Mies deployed his new functionalist concept of iron framework, doing away with load-bearing interior walls and allowing for more open and light spaces. The villa was composed of three levels (including the basement), with different floor plans and forms, each relating differently to the sloping site. The Southeast and garden facades were completely glazing from floor to ceiling. The villa Tugendhat was a rather large house, complete with two children’s bedrooms and nanny’s quarters that shared a bathroom at the front of the house, while the master bed and bath were at the rear and connected to the terrace. A housekeeper’s flat and staff quarters were also included in the design.

The villa was exceptionally expensive for its time considering the lavish materials, abnormal construction methods, and extraordinary new technologies of heating and cooling. The house was very advanced for a private residence, and while the overall cost was never known, estimates fall somewhere near five million Czech crowns. In 1930, that amount could have built at least 30 small family homes. Brno was already a hub of modern Architecture for Czechoslovakia in the 1920s, and the Villa Tugendhat was only met with moderate praise at best among the avant garde in its time. Many of the left wing elite in the art world viewed the new home as snobbish and overdone because its lush interior design and furnishings.

Mies designed all the furniture in the house and chose precisely the placement of each piece and fixture. Although there was no art on the walls or decoration in or on the house, it never came across as bare or plain because of the rich materiality of onyx and rare tropical woods used throughout the home. The villa was built by building contractors in Brno, but the iron framework was constructed by contractors from Berlin. Steel frame construction was unusual for homes at that time, but brought with it many advantages that Mies was very occupied with and had already used in his famed Barcelona Pavillion – thinner walls, a free plan that could differ from floor to floor, large walls of glazing to open up rooms and connect them to the garden, etc. Over all the minimal and stable design became a hallmark in Mies’ residential accomplishments.

(via acidadebranca)